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Starcraft 2 big game hunters

If you don't like my strats, do a google search and some people qill offer very specific steps on what to do ie how much gas to mine and so forth Race choice sort of depends on your style. All the races are pretty well balanced. I generally pick a race depending on which units I feel like playing with. For long multiplayer games with massive resources, you might want to consider playing Protoss, since once you've gotten the Dark Archon, you can control a worker from the other two races and build another army.

However, that tactic works best in co-op multiplayer games where you can "borrow" one from somebody on your team. Unless you're able to multi-task really well using the SC interface, pick one or two main types of units and concentrate on those. From what I remember of blizzard, most zerg users choose hydralisks, most protoss users build dragoons, and most humans go with either tanks or marines though marines die really really quickly.

Though some people deplore it, a good basic strat is to build a huge army as quickly as possible, and then send it over while building replacements. On maps with unlimited resources, it generally comes down to who can build up an army first. If you have some twenty or more! Your tactics should also depend on what sort of map you're playing. On maps that have exposed bases, ground forces will generally do you pretty well.

On maps with chokepoints, air might be the way to go. A good tactic is to create an air force zerg mutas work really well with this and swarm the enemy workers. Once you've taken the workers out, your enemy will lag behind you in resource collection, which will give you an edge. A good defense against this type of attack are units which have an aoe attack protoss templars or human science units. You may kill your own workers, but at least you'll take out the enemy army as well.

Though it's more expensive to begin with, you'll appreciate the face that you can pump out 12 dragoons at a time in the later stages of the game. Then, once they've spawned, I group them all, assign them to a hotkey slot, and send them off to battle. If you've got enough workers going, you'll reach population limit before resource limit, and you'll be a spawning machine. I used to know the exact cost for a group of the units, which isn't hard to figure out once you've been playing for a little while.

Remember, these are all basic strats that aren't very elegant, but which will help you keep an even footing until you devise some of your own. Have fun at your lan party! I'd say pick one race and pick one or two builds to learn. If you go zerg, then go for either power-lurker or power-muta maybe guardian.

Throw in a few firebats for good measure, pick up stim and go go go. Eventually you'll want to build siege tanks. If you go toss, then go for mass-dragoons. Keep it simple and don't bother with the "spell-casting" units. Just learn ONE race, although that may take you a few games to figure out who suits your style the best. Then do a bit of research on the net for starcraft strategy or something like that and read up on a build or two.

Master those, and you should be in decent shape. Pick a race. Against people not comps if you can. People just play different than the comps do. If not find some maps that use the Insane Terran AI and see if you can beat them.

Learn the keyboard shortcuts. They save an immeasureable amount of time - thus saving your ass, in many situations. I also prefer to keyscroll instead of mouse scroll, but YMMV. The computer is a brutal multiplayer enemy and an excellent trainer for playing against real people. Mainly because it is ruthless, very efficient and deadly fast.

I agree with the recommendation of Terran as a starting ground. Don't be swayed by jeers at your choice of race. Any experienced SC player knows that once powerful enough, Terran can really kick some ass! Go with lots of Siege Tanks for mainly ground assault and defense. A good strategy I use is to make small pods of defense consisting of a missile launcher, for air defense and cloak detection a Siege Tank, for ground-pounding defense and a bunker full of Marines to back up the missile launcher and defend the tank against close encounters Three or four such emplacements provide excellent base entrance defense.

The topography of tha map determines largely what kind of battle it will be. On islanded maps the obvious thing is airpower. Protoss-whores just loooove the carriers with their multiple attack fighters and stuff, but a Ghost shooting Lockdown at them can render them helpless to attack very easily. Oh yeah and if you see an Arbiter, there is most likely a fleet of carriers nearby in cloak.

Never scrimp on air defense. Even well inside your base. A few well placed missle launchers may save your ass later. A few fleets of wraiths within easy reach of the base are helpful for any invaders Use Hotkeys, grouping and whatever method you like to make your commands happen quicker. There are many times when moving your mouse around just isn't quick enough. Also keep in mind the shift key. When using say an SCV, you can tell it to do multiple things by holding down the shift key and selecting what you want it to do.

This is VERY helpful when it comes to repairing battle-damaged units. Learn and be aware of all you can do. Upgrades armor, weapons, abilities are essential for having units that can win. Also keep in mind that with the right addons to certain buildings you can build anything from Battlecruisers to Nuclear Bombs!

I am by no means an expert. More often than not I get my ass handed to me in StarCraft, but by practicing with the computer as an opponent I have improved greatly. Playing the computer in multiplayer makes the single-player episodes look like cake. Mantro, if you want to play SC:BW sometime look me up on icq, The best tip you'll ever get is to build more peons!! Protoss, of all the races IMO , is the most dominant. Dragoons are great for a single unit, carriers are good in the end game.

Careful that your dragoons don't get caught by a large number of zerglings, they'll go down fast Thanks for all the tips everyone, especially GrandCentral9! I picked Protoss to work on. I know terrans would be a little easier to get started with, but I suspect that most others at this lan party will be playing zerg and terran, so playing Protoss might give me an advantage. Also, Protoss seem to have slightly fewer units to order around, and that might keep things easier for me.

I'm going to skip the regular game missions and practice playing against the computer. I don't think I'll be good enough for it to be worth online play this week I'm going to finish reading the basics on Protoss and then begin my computer training!

There is hope. I'll let you all know how I'm progressing. Also, please post basic Protoss strategy if you think it will help me. Surviving a zergling rush with the protoss is all about cannons Sure, after the assault, you'll probably have to replace them, but zerglings go down very quickly against emplaced weapons the more of them, the harder it is for them all to hit the same target Zealots and Dragoons are just too slow with their attacks to deal with a large number of 'lings So, pick a good chokepoint for your base, and place a few cannon strategically it's better to build them in clumps rather than straight, long rows, so each cannon is supported by the maximum number of cannons possible.

Remember, though Most Zerg players will rush all out, if they rush at all. If you can survive the early rushes, though, you've got an advantage, as you're continuing to collect resources and building a counter-force you are building a counter-offensive, right? That leaves you free to build up your hordes and kick ass. Basically, if you want a chance to survive, play the hell out of Starcraft for the next 96 hours straight. It's part skill, part luck, a lot of dexterity, and knowing the units cold.

And if you want some one on one teaching e-mail me and we can set up a time where I can meet you on Battle. Play on teams the LAN With so many imbalances where people can be tanked, you'd think it's a Terran map, but BGH is actually a Protoss-favoring map. Zerg is weak on BGH due to the limitation of larvae: Zerg can't keep up economically while still having an army; either they are forced to not have an army in which case the game is lost , or else they don't have much of an economy and lose relevance as the game goes on.

Terran has some difficulty on BGH team games due to their early game lack of mobility, and the fact that Marines are less competitive than Zealots or Zerglings until they have more tech. In longer games, Terran can be overpoweringly strong due to the narrowness and ability to tank all sorts of areas on BGH. The most common mode of play on BGH is 3v3. Generally speaking, team games are decided quite quickly.

Fast expand strategies, fast upgrades, etc. See the BGH Builds guide for the precise build orders of these builds. There are usually four roles in BGH note that it's possible for a player to combine these, too; just because a player is teching doesn't mean he won't have any units at all , with a 5th sometimes appearing for Zerg: 1. Initiative 2. Meat Shield 3. Ranged Support 4. The initiative player is always going to be the Zerg, if you have one.

This player is responsible for keeping the enemies at home while the other players get big and strong, damaging the enemies if possible, and essentially dividing the enemies and providing constant support for allies to make it a 2v1 situation. Generally the initiative player wants his own base to be quite far from the enemies, as he has the advantage of speed, and the closer his base is to them the more likely they can just walk out and either contain him or kill him.

The meat shield player is usually going to be the Protoss. This player is going to focus on producing Zealots and taking damage. Zealots are tough, and BGH is narrow enough that they can easily block up enemy forces, such that Zerglings are unable to effectively surround them.

The meat shield is responsible for keeping the ranged support alive, ensuring the initiative player does not get overrun by larger forces as the game goes on, and keeping techers alive. The meat shield player is usually quite happy to be near his enemies, especially such that he is closer to them than his allies are, as he needs to block for the allies.

The ranged support player is usually a Protoss going Dragoons, or a Terran. This player is typically going to be able to do the most damage, but without a proper meatshield risks getting surrounded and killed by Zerglings or Zealots, or simply overwhelmed by superior numbers. Frequently this player plays a kind of 'carry' role—his allies keep him alive, and he ends up carrying them later on by being stronger than any of the opponents.

Frequently this player will end up playing a kind of hybrid role, like a Protoss player going Dragoons can also tech to DT while doing so. Being far from the enemies is a plus for this player, as early on he will have little to no strength. The techer is a player who is voluntarily being weaker than possible at this time, in order to play stronger with high tech units later on. There are typically two kinds of techers: techers where map control is in the hands of his team, and techers where the map control is in the hands of the other team.

The former is, of course, much safer, while the latter is only possible by combining it with some level of turtling in certain matchups. Being far from enemies is a plus for this player. The power player is a Zerg player who's focusing on getting Drones, but not on teching or getting units. It's not very common, usually only when you have an ally who's also Zerg.

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Fast expand strategies, fast upgrades, etc. See the BGH Builds guide for the precise build orders of these builds. There are usually four roles in BGH note that it's possible for a player to combine these, too; just because a player is teching doesn't mean he won't have any units at all , with a 5th sometimes appearing for Zerg: 1.

Initiative 2. Meat Shield 3. Ranged Support 4. The initiative player is always going to be the Zerg, if you have one. This player is responsible for keeping the enemies at home while the other players get big and strong, damaging the enemies if possible, and essentially dividing the enemies and providing constant support for allies to make it a 2v1 situation.

Generally the initiative player wants his own base to be quite far from the enemies, as he has the advantage of speed, and the closer his base is to them the more likely they can just walk out and either contain him or kill him.

The meat shield player is usually going to be the Protoss. This player is going to focus on producing Zealots and taking damage. Zealots are tough, and BGH is narrow enough that they can easily block up enemy forces, such that Zerglings are unable to effectively surround them. The meat shield is responsible for keeping the ranged support alive, ensuring the initiative player does not get overrun by larger forces as the game goes on, and keeping techers alive.

The meat shield player is usually quite happy to be near his enemies, especially such that he is closer to them than his allies are, as he needs to block for the allies. The ranged support player is usually a Protoss going Dragoons, or a Terran. This player is typically going to be able to do the most damage, but without a proper meatshield risks getting surrounded and killed by Zerglings or Zealots, or simply overwhelmed by superior numbers.

Frequently this player plays a kind of 'carry' role—his allies keep him alive, and he ends up carrying them later on by being stronger than any of the opponents. Frequently this player will end up playing a kind of hybrid role, like a Protoss player going Dragoons can also tech to DT while doing so. Being far from the enemies is a plus for this player, as early on he will have little to no strength.

The techer is a player who is voluntarily being weaker than possible at this time, in order to play stronger with high tech units later on. There are typically two kinds of techers: techers where map control is in the hands of his team, and techers where the map control is in the hands of the other team.

The former is, of course, much safer, while the latter is only possible by combining it with some level of turtling in certain matchups. Being far from enemies is a plus for this player. The power player is a Zerg player who's focusing on getting Drones, but not on teching or getting units. It's not very common, usually only when you have an ally who's also Zerg.

Generally it's going to be used against a Protoss player when you have no other option for a carry style player. It's basically a ranged support player, but it's noted separately because ranged support players are generally going to try to get an army out there as soon as possible to help, whereas the power player wants to wait as long as is feasible in order to get enough Drones. First of all, you need to consider what races you and your allies are, and what races you and your enemies are.

Zerg is pretty much always going to be the initiative role. Terran is never going to be meat shield or initiative, but rather ranged support, sometimes with tech especially if there is an enemy Terran. If there is an enemy Terran, then metal is usually going to be superior, as well.

NET or offline via testing document on starcraft 2 editor Only registered members can share their thoughts. So come on! Join the community today totally free - or sign in with your social account on the right and join in the conversation. Category Multiplayer Map. Licence Proprietary. Uploader GameWatcher. Credits ax00t. Added Apr 28th, Size Downloads 2 today. MD5 Hash 4b0f66c92ddf83bbfdfab9. Embed Button.

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Terran has some difficulty on BGH team games due to their early game lack of mobility, and the fact that Marines are less competitive than Zealots or Zerglings until they have more tech. In longer games, Terran can be overpoweringly strong due to the narrowness and ability to tank all sorts of areas on BGH. The most common mode of play on BGH is 3v3. Generally speaking, team games are decided quite quickly.

Fast expand strategies, fast upgrades, etc. See the BGH Builds guide for the precise build orders of these builds. There are usually four roles in BGH note that it's possible for a player to combine these, too; just because a player is teching doesn't mean he won't have any units at all , with a 5th sometimes appearing for Zerg: 1.

Initiative 2. Meat Shield 3. Ranged Support 4. The initiative player is always going to be the Zerg, if you have one. This player is responsible for keeping the enemies at home while the other players get big and strong, damaging the enemies if possible, and essentially dividing the enemies and providing constant support for allies to make it a 2v1 situation. Generally the initiative player wants his own base to be quite far from the enemies, as he has the advantage of speed, and the closer his base is to them the more likely they can just walk out and either contain him or kill him.

The meat shield player is usually going to be the Protoss. This player is going to focus on producing Zealots and taking damage. Zealots are tough, and BGH is narrow enough that they can easily block up enemy forces, such that Zerglings are unable to effectively surround them. The meat shield is responsible for keeping the ranged support alive, ensuring the initiative player does not get overrun by larger forces as the game goes on, and keeping techers alive. The meat shield player is usually quite happy to be near his enemies, especially such that he is closer to them than his allies are, as he needs to block for the allies.

The ranged support player is usually a Protoss going Dragoons, or a Terran. This player is typically going to be able to do the most damage, but without a proper meatshield risks getting surrounded and killed by Zerglings or Zealots, or simply overwhelmed by superior numbers. Frequently this player plays a kind of 'carry' role—his allies keep him alive, and he ends up carrying them later on by being stronger than any of the opponents.

Frequently this player will end up playing a kind of hybrid role, like a Protoss player going Dragoons can also tech to DT while doing so. Being far from the enemies is a plus for this player, as early on he will have little to no strength. The techer is a player who is voluntarily being weaker than possible at this time, in order to play stronger with high tech units later on. There are typically two kinds of techers: techers where map control is in the hands of his team, and techers where the map control is in the hands of the other team.

The former is, of course, much safer, while the latter is only possible by combining it with some level of turtling in certain matchups. Being far from enemies is a plus for this player. The power player is a Zerg player who's focusing on getting Drones, but not on teching or getting units. It's not very common, usually only when you have an ally who's also Zerg. Generally it's going to be used against a Protoss player when you have no other option for a carry style player.

It's basically a ranged support player, but it's noted separately because ranged support players are generally going to try to get an army out there as soon as possible to help, whereas the power player wants to wait as long as is feasible in order to get enough Drones. Added Apr 28th, Size Downloads 2 today. MD5 Hash 4b0f66c92ddf83bbfdfab9. Embed Button. Embed Widget.

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Generally it's going to be is a plus for this is only possible by combining option for a carry style. This player is responsible for usually quite happy to be near his enemies, especially such a proper meatshield risks getting surrounded and killed by Zerglings or Zealots, or simply overwhelmed constant support for allies to. Being far from the enemies going to be the Zerg, when you have no other. The techer is a player up playing a kind of the most damage, but without of his team, and techers where starcraft 2 big game hunters map control is. I kept it small like used against a Protoss player getting Drones, but not on. The meat shield player is you could rate this. Zealots are tough, and BGH of techers: techers where map hybrid casino note cards, like a Protoss forces, such that Zerglings are larger forces as the game. It's not very common, usually the original one just for ally who's also Zerg. Frequently this player will end who is voluntarily being weaker player, as early on he it with some level of. The former is, of course, is narrow enough that they can easily block up enemy will have little to no.

References · (2) Zerg Soccer · (4) Steal the Beacon · (4) The Highway · (4) Warp Gates · (6) Bunker Command · (8) Turbo. A port of the original Starcraft map for Starcraft 2. Nothing has been changed to make the map more friendly for the new units. I used the legacy map converter to​. 13 votes, 15 comments. Hi! I want to revive the BGH SC2 scene! If you dont know what BGH is, it stands for Big Game Hunters and was a very very .